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LEGENDS 2011. MARK WILLIAMS
MARK WILLIAMS
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Mark Williams considers himself a client’s designer and credits his success to his Mid-Western sensibility and his desire to marry his clients’ ideas with his vision. His team is experienced in guiding the interiors with a great respect for the integrity of the architecture. As a result of Mark’s collaborative way of working, his clients consistently feel they are living in their own creation. When you enter a home by Mark Williams, you always feel welcome. As Mark says, “I want your guests to feel they can sit, touch and be immediately at home”.

Mark has been featured in Traditional Home, Coastal Living, Better Homes & Gardens and in the Rizzoli publication Classic Homes of Los Angeles. He has been custom designing furniture through his line, Alton House, which is available to the general public.

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In an effort to give you a sneak peek into the highly anticipated window displays at LEGENDS OF LA CIENEGA 2011: CELEBRATE ART, we asked the Legends designers to share the inspiring thoughts and aesthetics behind their Legends window in the La Cienega Design Quarter. "The Legends Style Sheet" sponsored by Jean de Merry, presents a series of fun and unconventional interviews with our participating window display designers.

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MARK WILLIAMS
INSPIRED BY MARK ROTHKO
AT JOHN NELSON

Mark Rothko was born in 1903 in Russia. By the time he was 20 he had moved to the United States and became one in a small group of artists who established New York as the dominant center of the art world. In the 1920s his work was dark, moody, featuring expressionist interiors and urban themes. During this time, to supplement his income, Rothko taught classes at Center Academy where he remained a professor until 1952.

By 1936 Rothko began to write about the similarity between the art of children and the modern painters. The belief that modern art is primitive and begins with color informed his deconstructed work, featuring transcendent fields of color for which he is most known. In 1954 Rothko exhibited a solo show at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he met art dealer Sidney Janis, who represented Pollack and Klein. Their relationship proved mutually beneficial and Rothko catapulted to fame and fortune. Regardless, Rothko felt misunderstood and that the true purpose of his work was not being grasped by collectors, audiences, or critics. For Rothko, color is “merely a statement,” and his paintings are representative of human emotion, not decoration.

The Rothko chapel located in Houston Texas is a post modern windowless geometric structure. The chapel was to be a destination – a place of pilgrimage far from the center of art (New York). The chapel is the culmination of six years of Rothko’s life and represents his concern for transcendence and spirituality.

In 1970 Rothko’s assistant found the artist in his kitchen lying dead covered in blood. His suicide was a combination of overdose and slit wrists. In May 2007, Rothko’s painting “White Center” broke the record, selling at $72.8 million.

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